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  • Meet the Artist - Lizzie Greco of Craftbelly

    We immediately fell for the contemporary designs of Lizzie Greco's Craftbelly paper products and knew that they would fit perfectly into our customers' lives. As part of our occasional Meet the Artist blog series, we're pleased to provide a peek into her background and what fuels the engine of her talent and inspiration. 

    How did you get started in designing and making your products – how did you learn to do what you do? 

    After going to school for graphic design and working in the field for a couple of years, I ended up working at a stationery store in Chicago where we were given the unique opportunity to sell items that we had made ourselves. I was in love with the beautiful decorative papers we sold there and began covering wood frames with it and selling them in the store. Those first frames were really crude and I had no idea at the time I wanted to turn it into a business, but it became such a great outlet to work with my hands and I just kept at it. After a couple of years of selling online and in craft shows and really perfecting my skills and process, I decided I wanted to design my own patterns and do this thing for real! This next step came naturally to me as it satisfied both the designer and craftswoman in me! 

    Where do you find your inspiration – how do you come up with your design ideas?

    I have always been drawn to bold and colorful patterns, especially graphic ones. I usually just keep an ongoing inspiration board of pattern and color combos that excite me, whether they be from paper, textiles, wallpaper, rugs, you name it! My most recent collection was inspired by more natural elements, specifically the mountains, stars and flowers. I wanted to create a more graphic take on the things in real life that truly inspire me all the time!

    What are some design elements and/or products you are particularly excited about right now – both for your own work and what you're seeing from others?

    I am constantly amazed by artists who block print their own patterns onto paper and fabric. I think it's a wonderfully tactile process and I would imagine takes much more time and precision than most print methods. It really makes you appreciate the final product and I think it's awesome that artists are able to create their goods so thoughtfully and make a living from it! In terms of my own work, I have recently collaborated with Seattle based artist Cristina Miglino of Conjure Movement, where we screen printed a small collection of her hand drawn illustrations to be made into frames. I'm really excited to create products with these new designs as they are quite different from my own patterns but still translate quite nicely into my product line. 

    What advice would you give to other entrepreneurs in creative industries, especially those starting out?

    You truly need to enjoy and be passionate about what you are creating, because at some point you will become bogged down by all the other necessary and difficult but not very exciting parts of running a business. You won't actually be creating all the time, so when you are actually making or designing the things you are presenting and selling, you want to be able to find yourself over and over again in that process and be inspired to continue. I think that helps me get through the stuff I'm not so great at or don't necessarily take great pleasure in, such as accounting, marketing, etc., because I know it's all going towards the greater good of these products I am making that I love so much and want to share with the world. 

  • Father's Day | Man Made

    For Father's Day this year, give the father(s) in your life something distinct, handsome, and, yes . . . man made. We're featuring new products from some of our local gentleman makers. Whatever the media or material, the designs are fresh and purposeful and the quality is top notch. 

    Glass plate by Glass by Wood, custom t-shirts from Tarazzo Vintage Original, Hive Vessels from Housefish, and dual Trivet/Cutting Boards from Sjotime Industries.

  • Local Furniture Feature

    We've waxed poetic here before (at least attempted to!) about the local designers and craftspeople behind the making of Reverie Living. We're now featuring in the store, a few select furniture pieces from Where Wood Meets Steel, who built the store's custom shelving and fixtures.

    You can now own a piece of contemporary, handmade furniture that will make a statement in your home or office. In this case, a poetic statement to be sure.

  • Artist Interview with Helen Peterson of Cloth+Ink

    Welcome to another post in our ongoing conversations with the artists, designers, and craftspeople behind the products at Reverie Living. Here Helen Peterson of Cloth+Ink shares the impetus behind the boutique textile company she has created here in Colorado. 

    How did you get started - how did you learn to do what you do?

    Since childhood I've been surrounded by women working with fabrics.  My grandmother ran a fabric store on the high street and my mum made all of our clothes.  In high school I began screen printing textiles and fell in love with this art, propelling me onto a path of textile studies at university in the UK.  There I gained a wealth of knowledge from fiber manufacture to store merchandising. I've worked in fiber research and clothing manufacturing and now I'm putting that knowledge and experience into my own mini textile enterprise here in Colorado.

     

    Where do you find your inspiration - how do you come up with your design ideas, for both the fabric and the products themselves?

    I love being outdoors snapping photos and most of my inspiration comes from elements in these photographs.  I look for pattern mainly in nature but also from time to time in architecture as well.  I begin a design with a watercolor or sketch and play with how an element can be worked into a repeating pattern.  Because my designs are from organic inspirations, it has become important for me to carry this element through to the fabric bases I print on, which are all organic hemp and cotton blends.  I'm obsessed with the “hand” or feel of a fabric as well as its performance factors.  The aim for my products is for them to be useful and practical whilst looking beautiful.

    What are some design elements and/or products you are particularly excited about right now - both for your own work and what you're seeing from others?

    In my own work I'm excited about my move to organic fabrics.  I feel this has completed the circle with my work and I intend to continue with this in the future.  As for the work of others, I have a crush on all things wood right now, particularly walnut, with hints of mid-century influences.  I'm drawn to things made from natural, earthy materials like wood and stoneware, products that I have none of the skills or know how to make myself. 

    What advice would you give to other entrepreneurs in creative industries? 

    Follow your vision, be clear on it but be flexible along the way.  Be open to mistakes as these are often the best learning points and listen to the feedback from others, as your work will be perceived in more ways than just your own intentions. 

  • Mother's Day Giving

    Everyone has a mother. She may not be with us in person, but is at the very least in spirit. Whether your Mother’s Day celebration is for a new mom or a great grandma, you want your sentiment to reflect just how you feel.  

    We think that three of our local jewelry designers create pieces that fit the bill perfectly for Mother’s Day. They are beautiful in their simplicity and represent the kind of artistry every mother deserves. Here are just a few examples of pieces we have that could bring a smile to any Mother.

    Glazed Enamel Series from Susan Murphy of Doozie Jewelry:

    Hammered Shapes Necklaces from Katherine Sanz of Moonspun Jewelry:

     

    Delicate Briolettes on Silk Cord from Alison Blair Studios:

      

  • Plan B: An Introduction

    Six months ago today my reverie became a reality. A question that I am frequently asked, particularly by people who know me fairly well is, why open a boutique? I have spent 25 years in nonprofit management, and as wonderful and meaningful as those years have been, it was time for a change. A radical change.

    Ironically, shopping has never been one of my most favorite pursuits. But I am passionate about inspiring experiences, especially unplanned ones that just happen. Like walking into a shop that makes your heart skip a beat right at the threshold. And then finding something inside that’s absolutely perfect – for you or someone in your life. At Reverie Living, we are committed to providing such an experience while showcasing great design with function; quality with affordability. And what I ended up discovering in this process, is that I love shopping for you.

    Functional Design Provisions – that’s my Plan B. What’s yours?

    -Amy

     Hand-made notebooks from Make My Notebook, Sara Blette, Denver Artist & Designer

    Available at Reverie Living